CISCO Wireless Interview Questions Part 1

What is Cisco wireless networking?

Cisco is a leading provider of networking equipment and software. Their wireless networking products include a range of access points, routers, and switches that allow businesses to build and maintain a wireless network for their employees and customers. These products use various wireless technologies, such as WiFi, to provide connectivity for devices such as laptops, smartphones, and tablets. Cisco’s wireless networking solutions are designed to be scalable, secure, and easy to manage, making them a popular choice for businesses of all sizes.

What Is a WLAN Controller with Example ?

A WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network) controller is a device that helps manage and optimize the performance of a wireless network. It is responsible for maintaining a connection to all of the access points (APs) on the network, and for managing the flow of traffic between the APs and the wired network.

There are several different types of WLAN controllers, including hardware controllers, virtual controllers, and cloud controllers.

  • Hardware controllers are physical devices that are installed in a network closet or server room. They are typically used in larger enterprise networks and offer the most control and visibility over the wireless network.
  • Virtual controllers are software programs that run on a server or virtual machine (VM). They offer many of the same features as hardware controllers, but are more flexible and easier to deploy.
  • Cloud controllers are managed through a web-based interface and are hosted by a third-party provider. They are typically used in smaller networks and offer a more streamlined, “hands-off” approach to managing the wireless network.

Examples of WLAN controllers include the Cisco Wireless LAN Controller (WLC) and the Aruba Mobility Controller. These controllers can be used to manage a wide range of access points, including both indoor and outdoor APs, and support various wireless technologies such as WiFi 6 and 802.11ac.

What factors should be considered when deciding on the size of a controller for a wireless network?

There are several factors to consider when deciding on the size of a WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network) controller for your wireless network. These may include:

  1. Number of access points (APs): The size of the controller should be based on the number of APs that it needs to support. A larger controller may be able to handle a larger number of APs, which can be important if you have a large or growing network.
  2. Number of users: The number of users on the network can also impact the size of the controller you need. A larger controller may be able to handle more traffic and support a larger number of users, especially in high-density environments.
  3. Performance requirements: The performance needs of your wireless network should also be taken into account when selecting a controller. A larger controller may be able to offer faster performance, especially in environments where there are many users and devices accessing the network simultaneously.
  4. Budget: The cost of the controller should also be considered when selecting the right size for your network. Larger controllers may have a higher upfront cost, but they may also be more cost-effective in the long run if they can support a larger number of APs and users.
  5. Deployment: The size of the controller may also affect how it is deployed in your network. Larger controllers may require more physical space and may need to be installed in a network closet or server room, while smaller controllers may be more suitable for desktop or rack-mount deployment.

Overall, it is important to carefully evaluate the needs of your wireless network and choose a controller that is appropriately sized to meet those needs.

How does AP connect to WLC?

An access point (AP) connects to a wireless LAN controller (WLC) in order to be managed and to provide wireless connectivity for devices on the network. Here is a simple example of how an AP might connect to a WLC:

  1. The AP is powered on and begins broadcasting a wireless signal.
  2. A device (such as a laptop or smartphone) connects to the AP’s wireless network.
  3. The device sends a request to the AP for an IP address, which the AP assigns to the device.
  4. The AP sends a message to the WLC, introducing itself and requesting to join the network.
  5. The WLC sends a message back to the AP, accepting the request and providing the AP with the necessary configuration information (such as the IP address of the WLC).
  6. The AP establishes a connection to the WLC and begins forwarding traffic between the wireless network and the wired network.
  7. The WLC manages the AP and the devices connected to it, ensuring that they have reliable connectivity and are able to communicate with other devices on the network.

This is a simplified example of how an AP might connect to a WLC. In practice, there may be additional steps involved and more complex configurations depending on the specific network architecture and requirements.

What can be the difference between WLAN and VLANs?

WLAN (Wireless Local Area Network) and VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network) are both networking technologies that are used to segment a larger network into smaller, more manageable pieces. However, there are some key differences between the two:

  1. WLAN is a wireless networking technology that uses radio frequency (RF) waves to transmit data between devices, while VLAN is a networking technology that uses switches and routers to segment a network into smaller, logical subnetworks.
  2. WLANs are typically used to provide wireless connectivity for devices such as laptops, smartphones, and tablets, while VLANs are used to create isolated network segments within a larger network.
  3. WLANs are generally used to provide connectivity for devices within a smaller area, such as an office or home, while VLANs are often used to segment larger networks, such as those found in enterprise environments.
  4. WLANs are typically managed using a wireless LAN controller (WLC), while VLANs are managed using switches and routers that are configured to support VLAN tagging.

Overall, WLAN and VLAN are two different technologies that serve different purposes within a network. WLAN is used to provide wireless connectivity for devices, while VLAN is used to create logical subnetworks within a larger network.

can WLC’s and AP’s on the same subnet/VLAN ?

It is generally recommended to place wireless LAN controllers (WLCs) and access points (APs) on the same subnet or VLAN (Virtual Local Area Network). This allows the WLC and APs to communicate with each other and allows devices connected to the APs to access the network.

There are a few reasons why it is generally recommended to place WLCs and APs on the same subnet or VLAN:

  1. Simplicity: Placing WLCs and APs on the same subnet or VLAN can simplify the network architecture and make it easier to manage.
  2. Performance: Placing WLCs and APs on the same subnet or VLAN can improve performance by reducing the number of hops required for traffic to travel between the WLC and APs.
  3. Security: Placing WLCs and APs on the same subnet or VLAN can help to improve security by reducing the risk of unauthorized access to the network.

However, there may be certain situations where it is necessary to place WLCs and APs on different subnets or VLANs. For example, if the network is particularly large or complex, it may be necessary to segment it into multiple subnets or VLANs in order to improve performance or security. In these cases, it is important to carefully plan the network architecture and ensure that the WLC and APs are properly configured to communicate with each other.

Real life Example(Interviwer favorite questions)

I have a WLC 2504 in one site and a WLC 5508 in another site. I want to configure the 5508 as a backup controller for the APs registered in the 2504, but I don’t want the APs registered to the 5508 using the 2504 as a backup controller. The molibity feature is the best one in this case? How can I achieve this goal?

The mobility feature in a wireless LAN controller (WLC) can be used to configure a primary-backup relationship between two controllers, such as a WLC 2504 and a WLC 5508. In this configuration, the APs registered to the primary controller (the 2504) can use the backup controller (the 5508) as a failover option in the event that the primary controller becomes unavailable

To achieve this goal, you can follow these steps:

  1. Configure the 2504 as the primary controller and the 5508 as the backup controller. This can typically be done through the WLC management interface.
  2. Configure the APs to use the 2504 as their primary controller and the 5508 as their backup controller. This can also be done through the WLC management interface or by configuring the APs individually.
  3. Test the failover functionality by simulating a failure of the primary controller (such as by shutting it down or disconnecting it from the network). The APs should automatically fail over to the backup controller and continue to operate as normal.

It is important to note that in order for the APs to use the backup controller as a failover option, they must be able to reach it over the network. This may require configuring appropriate routing and network connectivity between the two controllers.

Overall, the mobility feature in a WLC can be a useful tool for configuring a primary-backup relationship between controllers and ensuring that APs have a failover option in the event of a controller failure.

People Also View below Post

By – https://quicksoftwarereview.com
By – https://quicksoftwarereview.com
By – https://quicksoftwarereview.com
By – https://quicksoftwarereview.com

Leave a Comment