Azure Vnet Peering

Introduction

Virtual Network Peering is a feature in Microsoft Azure that allows you to connect two Azure virtual networks (VNets) together. This allows resources in one VNet to communicate with resources in another VNet as if they were on the same network.

Virtual Network Peering can be used to:

  1. Connect resources in different VNets to enable communication between them.
  2. Connect resources in different regions to enable cross-region communication.
  3. Connect resources in different subscriptions to enable communication between them.

Virtual Network Peering is a simple and fast way to connect VNets, and it does not require a VPN gateway or an additional virtual appliance. It is also fully transparent to applications and users, as the peered VNets appear as a single VNet to them.

To create a Virtual Network Peering, you need to go to the Azure portal, select the VNets you want to connect, and click on the “Create peering” button. You will then be able to configure the peering settings, such as the traffic direction and whether to allow forwarded traffic. Once the peering is established, the resources in the peered VNets can communicate with each other using their private IP addresses.

How does Azure VNET Peering affect the traffic flow between VNets?

For example, is traffic routed through an on-premises network or through the internet?

Virtual Network Peering in Azure allows resources in different VNets to communicate with each other as if they were on the same network. This means that traffic between peered VNets is not routed through the internet or an on-premises network, but is instead directly routed between the VNets.

Virtual Network Peering establishes a direct, high-bandwidth and low-latency connection between the peered VNets. This connection is established over the Azure backbone network, which is a private network that connects all Azure regions and data centers.

As a result, traffic between peered VNets is not subjected to the same security risks or performance limitations as traffic that is routed over the internet. It is also not charged for data transfer fees, as it is considered “internal” traffic within Azure.

However, it is important to note that Virtual Network Peering does not allow resources in one VNet to communicate with resources in another VNet using public IP addresses. It only allows communication using private IP addresses, which means that resources must be addressed using their private IP addresses within the VNet’s address space.

Is Azure VNET Peering bidirectional?

Yes, Virtual Network Peering in Azure is bidirectional by default, which means that resources in either of the peered VNets can communicate with resources in the other VNet.

When you create a Virtual Network Peering, you can specify the traffic direction between the peered VNets. You can choose to allow either:

  • Forwarded traffic: This allows resources in one VNet to initiate connections to resources in the other VNet, and vice versa. This is the default setting.
  • Reverse forwarded traffic: This allows resources in one VNet to initiate connections to resources in the other VNet, but not vice versa.

Regardless of the traffic direction you choose, resources in the peered VNets can communicate with each other using their private IP addresses. This allows you to create a seamless communication experience between the VNets as if they were on the same network.

It is important to note that Virtual Network Peering does not allow resources in one VNet to communicate with resources in another VNet using public IP addresses. It only allows communication using private IP addresses, which means that resources must be addressed using their private IP addresses within the VNet’s address space.

“How to enable Global VNet peering in Azure”

To enable Global VNet peering in Azure, follow these steps:

  1. In the Azure portal, navigate to the virtual network that you want to peer with another virtual network in a different Azure region.
  2. In the left menu, click on “Peering” and then click on the “+ Add” button to create a new peering.
  3. In the “Create virtual network peering” blade, select the virtual network that you want to peer with from the “Remote virtual network” dropdown list.
  4. Select the “Global” option under “Peering location” and then click on the “Create” button to create the global VNet peering.
  5. After the global VNet peering is created, you can establish a connection between the two virtual networks by creating a VPN connection or by using a network virtual appliance.

Note: To use Global VNet peering, both virtual networks must be in the same Azure Active Directory tenant and subscription.

Use of Global VNet peering in Azure

Global VNet peering allows you to connect two virtual networks (VNets) in different Azure regions directly over the Microsoft global network, without the need for gateways, VPNs, or public IP addresses. This enables you to share resources between the two VNets, such as virtual machines, with low latency and high bandwidth.

Here are some common use cases for Global VNet peering:

  1. Disaster recovery: You can use Global VNet peering to replicate resources between regions for disaster recovery purposes.
  2. Geo-distributed applications: You can use Global VNet peering to build multi-region applications that need to communicate with each other with low latency.
  3. Data replication: You can use Global VNet peering to replicate data between regions for backup or compliance purposes.
  4. Hybrid scenarios: You can use Global VNet peering to connect on-premises networks to Azure VNets, or to connect multiple Azure VNets in different regions.

“How to troubleshoot VNet peering issues in Azure”

Here are some steps you can follow to troubleshoot VNet peering issues in Azure:

  • Verify that the VNet peering connection has been established successfully: In the Azure portal, navigate to the virtual network that has the peering connection, and click on “Peering” in the left menu. You should see the peering connection in the list of peerings. The status of the peering should be “Connected”.
  • Check the peering settings: Make sure that the peering settings, such as the VNet address spaces and the allowed traffic, are configured correctly.
  • Verify network connectivity: You can use the “ping” or “traceroute” command to verify network connectivity between the two virtual networks. You can also use the “Test-NetConnection” PowerShell cmdlet or the “az network vnet-peering test” Azure CLI command to test connectivity between the two VNets.
  • Check the routing tables: Make sure that the routing tables in both virtual networks are configured correctly and that there are no conflicting routes.
  • Check the NSG rules: If you are using network security groups (NSGs), make sure that the NSG rules are allowing the traffic between the two VNets.
  • Check for any active alerts: In the Azure portal, navigate to the “Monitor” blade and check for any active alerts that could be related to the VNet peering issue.
  • Check the Azure Service Health page: The Azure Service Health page provides real-time information on the health of Azure services and any known issues that could affect your resources. You can check this page to see if there are any known issues that could be affecting your VNet peering.
  • Check the Azure activity log: The Azure activity log provides a record of all resource events in your Azure subscription. You can use the activity log to troubleshoot VNet peering issues by searching for any relevant events or errors.
  • Check the Azure support page: If you are unable to resolve the VNet peering issue, you can check the Azure support page for any known issues or workarounds, or you can open a support request with Microsoft Azure Support.

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